Tag Archives: L’Artisan

Fate Man by Amouage

Amouage Fate Man

My first recollection of cumin in a fragrance was Le Labo’s Rose 31. It confused me early on as I found its warm, sweaty body order like smell jarring. When I realized it was supposed to be there, the scent grew on me. and it has become one of my favorite scents. Saffron caught my attention when I was in Paris a few years ago and sampled L’Artisan’s Safran Troublant at the Lourve. Its sweat heat was an instant win for me. Both cumin and saffron are prevalent in the opening of Amouage’s Fate Man, which not only caught my attention but has continued to excite my olfactive bulbs.

Fate Man for me has been a troubling scent. Every time I’ve worn it, I realize another layer and for that reason, I appreciate its craftsmanship. The very first time I wore it, I picked up the cumin and saffron right away in the top notes and they pretty much overshadowed everything else. On another wearing, about four hours or so after applying it, I was in awe that my nose picked up the floral notes in the middle. I surely didn’t think it would go there after the pungent opening I experienced and that dramatic shift impressed me. I have since recognized there’s more going on in Fate Man’s opening and that tug of war between the freshness of mandarin and the zestiness of ginger and the animalic presence of cumin piques my interest. I should footnote here that my early test of Fate Man occurred in the middle of the summer and perhaps that heat agitated the cumin enough that it presented itself in stereo while the other notes were in analog.

If you’re a fan of Amouage’s collection of fragrances, you’ll recognize that Fate Man fits the story they’ve been telling. Their use of pungent spices, incense and woods has become defining traits of the brand. But Fate Man illustrates what I love about perfumery – just when you think a scent has flattened out, an interesting twist occurs and wakes you up. The right turn it takes in the middle was such a surprise for me that it sealed the deal on how I feel about it. On top of that, its longevity is superb. If Fate Man is your first encounter with Amouage, the amount of cumin you detect could affect your perception of this scent as it can be a polarizing note. In other reviews I’ve read, it would appear cumin played it’s part as opposed to my experience where it played an extended solo. Nevertheless, I suspect Fate Man will do well for Amouage and I look forward to the next chapter in this ongoing story Christopher Chong is superbly narrating.

Fate Man – 50ml – $280.

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Good Read…Los Angeles Times

Its been awhile since I’ve posted an article. But I was recently made aware of this one by some of my fragrant twitter pals and just got around to reading it. This is a recently published article in the Los Angeles that sheds light on Niche brands and their aim to bring to market quality fragrances. Some of the brands I’ve spoken about and many I own are mentioned in the article. They include, L’Artisan, Tauer Perfumes, Thierry Mugler, B Never Too Busy To Be Beautiful , Serge Lutens and by Kilian.

It’s a quick read, supported by some statistical information and quotes from some industry heayweights. Well worth a few minutes of your time. Read it here.

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Cote d’Amour by L’Artisan

cote d'amour

Lately, I’ve been thinking about the beach quite a bit. I have yet to get there this summer but around this time last year I had the most amazing vacation in Bermuda where I visited arguably one of the best beaches in the world, Horse Shoe Beach. Memories of the pink sand, hot sun, cool breeze and blue water were enough to make me envious of my girl TDC who just returned from there. That got me thinking of the time I played hookie while in college. I went with the flow, went with the young lady that coaxed me into going and I didn’t have a care in the world. I so lived in the now. The air was crisp, it was clean, and most of all it was as much sweet as it was salty. How I wish I could do that now and not worry about my crackberry. Memories such as these were recalled as I was testing the recently launched fragrance by L’Artisan, Cote d’Amour.

Developed by Celine Ellena, Cote d’Amour is a 100% organic eau de tiolette which carries the Cosmebio label, certified by Ecocert. Its inspiration was a trip along the Loire Atlantique coast where the senses are delighted by a soft caress of sea air and sand, of scents of golden yellow gorse, heather and broom and a sensual mixture of soft resin and floatwood.

Of all the beachy/aquatic scents I’ve come across, this one possesses a salty note that really brings it to life and for that reason sets it a part from the rest of the pack. In about two weeks, I’m escaping for a little vacation and have been thinking what fragrance should I take with me. My decision has been made.

Cote d’Amour is available in an 8.4 oz Eau de Toilette for $155. Also available is a Natural Nourishing Cream, 1.7 oz for $50 and a Natural Soothing Soap, 3.4 oz for $$35.

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Meet Stan Williams

stanwilliams

The year was 2006 and Stan Williams and I had lunch at the Bryant Park Hotel’s, Koi restaurant. At the time, he was the Fashion Director of Maxim magazine. I was a relatively young publicist clamoring for his time. As we were finishing up our chat, I blurted out, “you smell great, what are you wearing?” Stan replied, “Vetiver by Guerlain.” I remember being struck by how incredibly clean and masculine it smelt. I ran out the next day and bought my first bottle of this potion.

All of this rushed back into my head as the days led up to the party for his soon to be released book, The Find, held at Ports 1961’s Meatpacking boutique. Upon greeting him at the party, I reminded him of that day and told him I just had to interview him. He smiled and said “of course, I’ll be glad to.”

What’s your earliest recollection of fragrance?
My earliest recollections of fragrances were all those drug store brands that my dad used to wear: English Leather, Mennen, and all those Avon car-shaped-bottle aftershaves (in the Deep Woods fragrance) that he kept on his dresser. I also remember watching all the Hai Karate ads on TV and wanting a bottle of Jovan Sex Appeal when I was 11 or 12. I think I got it for Christmas as a joke.

What fragrances are currently in your rotation?
Mandarina Duck for Men, Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche, Aramis (really have a new-found love of it), Eau d’Hermes and L’Artisan Parfumeur’s Eau d’Absinthe.

How often do you go out looking for something new? What specifically do you look for?
I never go looking, but I always stop and try things. I don’t really have a profile. I like old-fashioned smelling fragrances, but I also like bright ones. It just depends on how I feel. However, I can never go wrong with the YSL Rive Gauche……

Have you ever purchased the same fragrance more than once? If so, what was it and what about it made it worthy of a repeat buy?
Yes…L’Artisan Parfeur, Hermes, and YSL Rive Gauche. I just love them, and I feel like they fit my personality.

How would you finish this statement. “My most memorable fragrant moment would be…?
When I was obsessed with Ralph Lauren Polo in high school and my best friend’s step mom somehow nabbed the gigantic display bottle for me. I was in heaven!

What is your book all about and might there be applicable tips for fragrance shopping?
The Find: The Housing Works Book of Decorating With Thrift Shop Treasures, Flea Market Objects, and Vintage Details is a book that takes people on a personal journey in learning how to find beauty in other people’s cast-offs. It’s filled with 500 original photographs of work by many of today’s tastemakers — GQ’s Jim Moore, Barneys New York’s Simon Doonan, decoupage artist John Derian, Real Simple’s Kristin Van Ogtrop, This Old House’s Alex Bandon — just to name a few — and hopefully empowers people to feel comfortable decorating their own environments with vintage and thrift.

When shopping for vintage and thrift, there’s also one thing that rings true for purchasing fragrances: only buy what you love. I say that when thrifting, don’t be over-obsessed with pedigree or brand. If you love it, it is good quality, and suits your purposes, then buy it. Same goes for fragrances. I think people sometimes buy a product because they are attracted to a brand name or a bottle. But bottom line, if the juice doesn’t work on you, then don’t wear it again. And try different options. Just like in thrift shopping, it may take a while to find what you’re looking for, you’ll eventually find the scent that suits you.

Thanks Stan. And for those who have no idea of the comedy associated with Hai Karate, enjoy:

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The road traveled to L’air du désert marocain

As I mentioned sometime ago, Fragrant Moments comes from an experiential perspective. That said, I hope you can appreciate the road that lead to L’Air du Desert Marocain.

If there’s one thing I like to do on a Saturday afternoon, when I have a free moment, is relax to a nice cigar. I did that this past Saturday and ran into a friend, Konstantie-Kahi. We hadn’t seen each other for the entire summer so we had quite a bit of catching up to do. Being he’s from Georgia, I naturally asked him what the conflict with Russia was all about. After breaking that down, and delving into American politics, we moved into frivolous but entertaining things like wine and music. Then something leads me to ask this worldly gent if he was into fragrances. Wholly shit, not only is he into them, but he immediately began name-dropping. After going back and forth about brands such as L’Artisan, Tom Ford, Mont Blanc, Le Labo, etc, we went on a spontaneous scent hunt; first stop L’Artisan on Thompson street. While there we smelled Fou d’Absinthe, and Passage d’Enfer. Next we stopped by the Mont Blanc store to smell their newest scent. From there, we hustled over to Aedes de Venustas, which I encouraged Konstantine to experience. Having never been there before, he entered the pearly scented gates of fragrance heaven. Frank, who’s cool as a cucumber, greeted us and immediately whizzed us around store after I pried out of Konstantine some of the brands he likes to help get us started. (Gents, when fragrance shopping, if you’re approached by a sales person, try to remember some of the brands you like, it really does make a difference in which direction they lead you).

Frank knows his scents. There wasn’t one he bought to us that I didn’t like. But without question L’Air du Desert Marocain was one of the most original and it left a lasting impression. Konstantine thought so as well…he purchased it. The scent is rich and layered. It nuzzles nicely into the skin and that’s when the magic begins. According to its maker, Andy Tauer, “L’air du désert marocain is a true scent of desire.” It’s mysterious, soft and spicy all at once. It’s not overly woody or overly this or that. It’s simply wicked. If I were traveling alone to an exotic locale, this would be the only scent I’d bring with me. Its that potent.