Tag Archives: Old Spice

Old Spice Body Spray Contest Winner Announcement

Old Spice Infographic

In my last post, I reviewed Old Spice’s New Body Spray Collection and mentioned their effort to stop overspraying. I told you how good I thought it was and held a contest so one lucky winner could experience their new technology, which slowly dispenses the scent over the course of the day. That lucky winner is Robert. Congratulations. I’ll be contacting you via email.

Above is an interesting but very telling infographic by Old Spice. Some interesting things to note are why overspraying happens and how to scent responsibly. Enjoy it and calm down. Worry less about if he or she will like how your smell and worry about not being “that guy.”

Old Spice Body Spray

Old Spice Re-fresh Swagger Body Spray FM

When I first learned about body sprays, I only saw them in the women’s section of stores. The scents were extremely girly and not very sophisticated. In retrospect, perhaps I was frowning on them too much. They are an affordable deodorizing option meant for a younger audience. Then it got crazy with the overspraying as options for men were introduced. I remember watching an episode of the Jersey Shore and I swear I started coughing the longer one of the guys sprayed himself.

I was recently contacted about Old Spice’s new body spray and their scent responsibly campaign. Given the backlash body sprays have taken, the fact that I’ve been a fan of their commercials and a few of their scents I’ve really liked, I was intrigued and had to learn more. As their press release explains it, they’re using “proprietary Re-fresh Technology that features a patented cyclic molecule with an empty core that absorbs some fragrance as the Body Spray dries on the skin. As a guy sweats, fragrance is pushed out of the core releasing bursts of scent when a guy needs it the most.” Whether you believe that or not, I moved forward with my testing but I had to make sure I didn’t overspray myself so I employed the 1 Mississippi rule.

When I was younger, we played football in the street. When cars wanted to pass, we stopped the game and resumed when they went by. The playing field was between the manhole covers and parked cars were out of bounds. We couldn’t rush the quarterback before 10 Mississippi and the pass rusher counted out loud, 1 Mississippi, 2 Mississippi and so on. As I thought about testing this collection of body sprays, it dawned on me that if this technology was all it was cracked up to be, a 1 Mississippi spray of the scent is all I would need and I was right.

These scents rush out of the can with a powerful burst. I actually thought maybe I sprayed longer than I was supposed to so I repeated the test another day saying 1 Mississippi out loud and the result was the same. The scent lasted a very long time and I’ll be honest, I was pleasantly shocked. From that short of a spray, my scent lasted easily 6-7 hours.

I applaud Old Spice for their scent responsibly campaign. I hope those of you that read this employ the 1 Mississippi rule. If that doesn’t work for you, Old Spice has a great video with their own set of rules that maybe more up your alley. Whatever you do gents, stop overspraying. No one wants to be “that guy.”

We’ve all oversprayed at one point in our life and I’d like to hear about your not so fragrant moment. Ladies, if he doesn’t tell us, you are welcome to tell us for him. Share one story in the comment section and one lucky winner will win a collection of the Old Spice Body Sprays along with a few other goodies. This contest will end at 11:59pm March 5th.

This is a sponsored post. The opinions expressed, however, are completely my own based on my experience.

Old Spice Giveaway

Old Spice Scented Bar Soaps

In my last post, I reviewed Old Spice’s new bar soap collection. In addition to liking the product, I also mentioned how I felt about their commercials. Well, the good folks at Old Spice are sponsoring this post and have given me some really cool prizes for a giveaway.  This is the first time we’re doing such a thing so we’re going to keep it simple. To enter the contest:

leave a comment below letting me know if you’ve tried the product or your feelings about the brand

For an additional entry:

follow me on twitter @fragrantmoments and share the contest using the hashtag  #smellitforward (leave a comment below to let me know you did so)

One winner, chosen with the help of random.org, will win Old Spice Bar Soap (Fiji, Pure Sport and Swagger), Old Spice towel, a shower radio ($200.00 value), and a manly shower curtain. Good luck gents.

The contest is open to U.S. residents only and closes Friday July 5, 2013 at 11:59 pm EST. The winner will be announced on Fragrant Moments and via twitter.

This contest is now over. Congratulations to the winner Chester Eugene Williams.

Old Spice’s New Appeal

Brooklyn Sunset

As the sun was setting this past Saturday night in Brooklyn, NY, I found myself smoking a great cigar and sharing spirits with dear friends. As the topic of conversation jumped around, inevitably we found ourselves talking about pop culture and reality TV. Aside from confessing our guilty pleasures, a particular moment stood out when we began discussing commercials. When we began reviewing those that caught our attention, we were in awe of how many we could recall in the age of DVR. We laughed at a few, questioned what were they thinking for others and tipped our hats to a few we found really progressive. For instance, we thought the Cheerios commercial with the interracial couple was cute and very timely and the Amazon Kindle commercial with the girl and gay guy on the beach caught us off guard, in a good way (we didn’t expect the ending but we were glad Amazon went there). This got me thinking about how some commercials targeting to men have been on point lately. One in particular, the Old Spice commercial with the guy being followed by a shower everywhere he goes is hilarious.

Old Spice recently launched a collection of scented soap bars and to bring it to the attention of men, debuted a series of commercials. For those that can remember the soap commercials of the 80’s, they were big on showcasing lather to catchy jingles. With a nod to the 80’s, Old Spice continues its dead on marketing approach by poking fun at these commercials of yesteryear. Every time I see them, I can’t help laughing. I actually planned on writing about them and then I was contacted about reviewing the collection.

Old Spice Scented Bar Soaps

I really like Old Spice’s new collection of scented soap bars. For a while I’ve been using body wash so this was a nice departure. The bars have been thoughtfully designed. Their shape and size allows the bars to rest comfortably in your hands. Each of the bars, Figi, Pure Sport and Swagger are very fragrant. On one occasion after taking a shower, I cracked the bathroom door and my wife commented that not only did the soap smell good but it also scented our entire bedroom. As for the soap’s performance, if you like a soap that produces a good lather and doesn’t dry out your skin, check and check. After using these soaps for two weeks, my skin feels just fine. My favorite of the three is Swagger. The scent is clean with a musky under tone and it just works. My wife on the other hand is a fan of Pure Sport so I guess I’ll be going between the two.

This is a sponsored post. The opinions expressed, however, are completely my own based on my experience.

Wordless Wednesdays

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Sartorial by Penhaligon’s

The very first time I smelled Penhaligon’s Sartorial I thought barbershop and tradition. It opens with a soft powdery smell that reminds me of the Saturday morning/afternoons I waited to get my hair cut, the sound of the clippers, the requests,” let me get X or Y,” those final moments before I got up from the chair; that stinging sensation from the alcohol as my barber went along my hairline and that fresh clean feeling of being a new man. How is it possible to have such details summoned from one smell? That is best answered by something I found on Penhaligon’s website in the “About Us” section and it says, “fragrance is liquid emotion.”

Scents that produced this sort of memory used to turn me off as I felt they leaned too heavily on tradition and the idea that “this is how men are supposed to smell.” But that didn’t happen with Sartorial. Perhaps that can be attributed to my new-found love for LP No 9 or my recent return from Barbados where I spent time with my uncles who are all very traditional in their fragrance and grooming habits and it’s starting to rub off on me. But as I thought deeper about the name and read its supporting press materials that talked about the tailoring tradition that influenced this scent, I began thinking of my own tailor.

Mr. Henry is a Trinidadian tailor I’ve been going to for well over a decade now. He’s old school, he knows my parents, is genuinely interested in how I’m doing, but more importantly, schools me on the finer details of menswear. But that last point needs qualifying. There’s an old adage that says, “rules are meant to be broken.” Mr. Henry is the first to tell me, “no cuff on flat front slacks, but the choice is yours, or the break in your slacks should be here but they are wearing it shorter these day so you tell me where you want them. He allowed me to make a choice that made me comfortable. His willingness to strike that balance, which is an update from the tailors of yesteryear, compliments my feelings toward Sartorial. While the dry down beckons tradition, woody and earthy, it opens with a softness that shaves off the overly masculine edge of tradition. A beautiful balance that speaks to the modern man.

Sartorial is inspired by the scents of the workroom at Norton & Sons, Bespoke Tailors at No. 16 Savile Row. Mr. Henry’s shop didn’t smell like that. It was old, filled with scraps of material; lose pins, chalk, measuring tape, a sewing machine and an old radio that cranked out soca music. But Mr. Henry smelled of a deodorant mirroring Old Spice, Brut or Right Guard. For him that was how a man was supposed to smell, fresh and clean but not frilly. Sartorial embodies the masculinity of today’s man and I think Mr. Henry would say, “Young fella, a man is supposed to smell like that.”

Sartorial by Penhaligon’s will be in stores October 11, 2010.

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Meet Stephen Greco

Love or hate Facebook, it can be addicting and it does possess the power of connecting individuals….and so begins this story.

I’ve known Stephen for a good few years and have always admired his intellect, his clarity of thought and endearing charm. To my surprise one day while surfing Facebook, his status message mentioned he was reading Chandler Burr’s Emperor of Scent. Could he be a fragrance enthusiast? Surely he must be if he’s reading this book. Well, I just had to inquire and what transpired was an enlightening exchange about scents, masculinity and memories of discovery.

Stephen, tell me a bit about your relationship with fragrances? What’s your earliest recollection?
My mother wore Chanel No.5 pretty religiously when I was a boy, and I can remember her being enveloped in a cloud of it when, on an evening she and my father were going out, she would come to my room rustling in a beautiful dress, her hair and makeup Hollywood-glorious, to tuck me in and kiss me good-night.

My father, at that time, was wearing Old Spice, which I found fully as exciting– though later my mother, sister and I bought him a bottle of Canoe, which we thought so much more sophisticated. This was in a small town in upstate New York, in the ’50s and ’60s. My father wasn’t the Canoe, type, though. Aqua Velva was his daytime alternative to Old Spice, and I used to love that, too– the equivalent of which, among the fragrances I use today, is Puig’s Agua Lavanda.

I was going to say that my first experience with fragrance for myself was a bottle of Guerlain’s Imperiale, which I begged my indulgent Aunt Fannie to buy for me after I’d seen an ad for it in the New York Times magazine. She did and I loved it, and then I went on to buy myself Guerlain’s Habit Rouge, a ridiculously adult fragrance for a small-town boy in Junior High. But come to think of it, I’d fallen in love years before that with the scent of Fitch hair tonic, which the barbers at Ed and Al’s used to apply to my fresh haircut, as a finishing touch. My father and I used to go to Ed and Al’s together on a Saturday morning, and I used to feel like man for the rest of the day, smelling of Fitch.

That said, how do you explain the period of time when you wore no fragrance at all?
I sort of came of age as a young gay man just at the time of what we used to call “liberation,” 1969, and for some reason– it’s complicated– it was felt politically important to move away from all vestiges of old-time faggotry, which include LOTS of fragrance, toward a new kind of gay masculinity that eventually flowered in The Clone. As I recall, Clones were not really allowed fragrance until official Clone scents came along–Halston’s Z (which I hated as too overwrought), then Drakkar Noir and the like. And even then certain bars and sex clubs were notorious for forbidding any fragrance, along with Lacoste shirts and designer jeans.

I have stories from those years about the powerful combination of body scents and fragrance, but those are perhaps for another blog.

What bought you back?
What can I say? Early on, I was taught to question all tyrannies, even those parading as politically or culturally correct. I started rocking fragrance whenever the hell I wanted to. And I was traveling a lot in the ’70s and ’80s, so I would often fall under the spell of various kinds of oils and attars that men of other cultures would anoint themselves with, and I adopted these, too.

Talk a bit about what Paco Robanne does to you?
Interesting! I was given a little silver metal canister of the “unisex” fragrance Paco at a party one night– this was in the ’90s, when I was at Interview magazine– and though intellectually I filed the scent under “CK1 knock-off,” emotionally I was transported. For me, Paco was pure, spray-on optimism! No other fragrance had ever reached me so deeply (except for the scent of fresh hyacinth flowers, which, unlike the scent of other flowers, affects me like a psychedelic drug).

This might be the spot to confess that if I have any “psychic” power at all, it would be to smell the future and past, not to see it. What that means, of course, I have no real idea. It’s not like American life is populated with mentors or guides in this area.

What fragrances are currently in your rotation?
Besides Paco and Agua Lavanda, to which I still turn a lot, I also use Davidoff’s Cool Water and Geoffrey Beene’s Bowling Green. Also in the mix are Arden’s Sandalwood and all the Penhaligon men’s fragrances– especially Blenheim, my first bottle of which I purchased in Wellington Street, Covent Garden, one New Year’s Eve in the ’80s, before boarding the Orient Express for an overnight voyage to Venice. For me, the composition and behavior of Blenheim is like that voyage: beginning in the cold, foggy north and heading south, toward the sun and opulence…

But I am also VERY partial to Penhaligon’s Bluebell, a cheeky little charmer that’s supposed for women but works very well on a man.

Oh, and when I am not buzzing my hair and have enough to style, I eagerly grab my Confixor, by Aveda, which isn’t very complicated but does kinda radiate a rosemary cheeriness, along with (I think) lavender.

How often do you go out looking for something new? What specifically do you look for?
This blog, along with books I’ve recently encountered by Luca Turin and Chandler Burr, are inspiring me to go out and look for something new. Until now, I guess I’ve been a bit slack about that– which is odd, since even as a kid, if I liked a certain quartet or novel or ballet, I had to check out everything else immediately by that composer or author or choreographer.

I found a sample of Lalique for Men in a goody bag last year and liked the fragrance a lot, but for some reason never purchased a bottle. Then a friend of mine, a retired dancer, brought me to Aedes de Venustas one day, and I felt too intimidated to poke around, try things, ask questions.

No more! I’m suddenly really jazzed up about smelling and smelling like…

Have you ever purchased the same fragrance more than once? If so, what was it and what about it made it worthy of a repeat buy?
All my Penhaligons are repeat buys. So is the Paco, which in a fever one night recently, years after I’d used up that first canister, I replenished via Ebay. After reading Turin I was afraid of a reformulation, but either Paco’s the same stuff or my nose is not smart enough to tell the difference.

How would you finish this statement. “My most memorable fragrant moment would be…?
Powdered fallen leaves, on that first, oddly warm, Indian Summer day of
fall…